Exhibition and Events 2018

 

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 Pentimento by Robert Weingarten

 Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento,  his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic  memory.” Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the  last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these  pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today. He notes  that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the  profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past. An  Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or  emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and  painted over.” Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with  the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”

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Warsaw, (1943) , 2011

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September 11, (2001), 2013

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Manzanar (1942 - 1944), 2011

 


 

The Space Between Symbols

by Corrie Siegel

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Opening date: Thursday, January 25th, 7:00 - 9:00 PM
Free and open to the public

An artist, curator and educator, Corrie Siegel is committed to using the arts as a method of personal philosophic exploration as well as a tool for community building.  Siegel’s works often explore identity and experience within a global system of communication. She plays with personal limitations of knowledge and understanding by using highly detailed observation, and involved processes for collecting and rendering her subject matter.  She has exhibited her work throughout the United States as well as internationally. Her projects have been profiled in the Los Angeles Times, Mousse Magazine, and Flash Art International.  Siegel is a founding member and co-director of Actual Size, an artist collective and gallery. Actual Size collaborates with established and emerging artists to activate the exhibition space and engage the public.

 

Artist's Statement: 

The cut paper works that comprise this series are created through overlaying text in a matrix to obscure the original message and reveal a pattern composed of symbols. Intricately detailed, the work is inspired by micrographic art by Hebrew scribes who sculpt, skew and stretch letters to create dynamic and textured compositions. The artist chose to dissect texts written in German including Hitler's "Mein Kampf". Through using the form of a traditional paper-cut, these loaded texts are abstracted and cut into fragile lace.

The paper-cut was once exceedingly common in Ashkenazic-Jewish homes, reaching its height of popularity in the 19th century into the early 20th. Paper-cuts served religious and other ritual needs, such as indicating the direction of prayer, remembering family deaths, holiday decoration, and warding off the evil eve. Artists adapted the cut paper technique that Jewish merchants had met through their travels to the Far East in the 14th century as well as the 17th century German paper-cuts, which were known as Scherenschnitt (scissor-cuts). In 1345, Rabbi Shem-Tov ben Yitzhak ben Ardutiel wrote The War of the Pen Against the Scissors. In this Hebrew text he recounted an occasion in which his inkwell froze on a cold winter’s evening. In order to continue his studies he resorted to cutting the letters out of the paper.

Created by Hebrew scribes in the late 9th century while transcribing the Masorah, which includes a system of marginal biblical notes that counted and listed textual details, this style of forming minute text into imagery enabled scribes to render images without blatantly violating Jewish law forbidding representation. This art form spread with the Jewish diaspora and evolved within the local cultural milieus. Micrography exemplifies the Jewish tradition of retaining identity while adapting to and affecting the local culture. Micrography also demonstrates the enduring Jewish pursuit of interpreting and navigating their evolving traditions.

 

 

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A lecture with Dr. Avivah Gottlieb Zornberg

"Exodus: Narrative or Anti-Narrative?"

Tuesday, April 24th at 7:30 PM

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The narratives underlying Sarah’s death and Rebecca’s marriage release a hidden midrashic theme. We will explore sources that suggest a common dynamic.

AVIVAH GOTTLIEB ZORNBERG is the author of The Beginning of Desire: Reflections on Genesis, for which she won the National Jewish Book Award (JPS 1995, paper Schocken 2011), and The Particulars of Rapture: Reflections on Exodus. (Doubleday 2001, paper Schocken 2011) Her latest book is: Bewilderments: Reflections on the Book of Numbers (Hardcover–February 24, 2015).  She was born in London and grew up in Glasgow, Scotland, where her father was a Rabbi and the head of the Rabbinical Court.  She studied with him from childhood; he was her most important teacher of Torah. She holds a BA and PhD in English Literature from Cambridge University. After teaching English literature at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, she turned to teaching Torah. For the past thirty years, she has taught Torah in Jerusalem. Dr. Zornberg holds a Visiting Lectureship at the London School of Jewish Studies. She travels widely, lecturing in Jewish, academic, and psychoanalytic settings.

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Co-sponsored by: The New Center for Psychoanalysis (NCP) in Los Angeles

Lovingly sponsored in memory of Gloria D. Nimmer

 


 

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theatre dybbuk in association with the Dortort Center

Presents

World Premiere of the play

lost tribes

Written and directed by artistic director of the theatre dybbuk

Aaron Henne

 

This event has reached maximum capacity

Click here to sign up for the wait list

 

Date: March 10th 2018, 8:00 PM

Location: Spiegel Auditorium at UCLA Hillel

574 Hilgard Ave. Los Angeles CA, 90024.

 

Inspired by the stories of the lost tribes of Israel, theatre dybbuk presents a full-length theatrical work, rich in movement, original music, and lyrical language that relates ancient mythological and tribal narratives to contemporary questions of integration, appropriation, and belonging.

In the early eighth century BCE, the Neo-Assyrian Empire conquered the Northern Kingdom of Israel, from whence it has been said that ten of the twelve ancient tribes of Israel were deported and assimilated. These tribes are now lost to history, with a variety of folktales, legends, and theories about their fates having come about since that time. Some are told from the point of view of those who regard themselves as members of a lost tribe, while others are told from an outside perspective in order to make a case for self-serving outcomes.

Framed in the context of a gallery exhibition, lost tribes weaves together stories from the Assyrian conquest to the present day, tracing a world history of assimilation and dominance; of cultural conquest, annihilation, and survival. The performance incorporates choreography by Kai Hazelwood and a live percussion score composed by Michael Skloff, created in collaboration with Emilia Moscoso Borja and Alex Shaw. The production is written and directed by theatre dybbuk's artistic director, Aaron Henne, and was developed with the ensemble.

 

Admission: Free and open to the public

Hourly parking is available at Parking Lot #2 on the corner of Hilgard Ave and Westholme.

 

Learn more at: http://www.theatredybbuk.org/lost-tribes  

 

 


 

 

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